monday-5.16

Monday Catch-up: Newsletters,“Emotional Opt-outs” and Email’s Value

Happy Monday marketing mavens! Let’s kick off the week with a few news items. Enjoy!

Drive ROI with email newsletters

Larry Alton, writing at cio.com, makes the case for email newsletters as a critical driver of email-marketing ROI, saying “email newsletters can be harnessed by almost any industry, or any size company, and they can be integrated with various other marketing strategies and tactics … if you know what you’re doing.” He also shares seven ways to integrate email newsletters with your other marketing channels. The article calls email marketing “one of the most beneficial marketing strategies you can employ,” citing its capacity to generate higher ROI than SEO, content marketing and paid search advertising.

Dealing with “emotional opt-outs”

In an “Email Insider” column at mediapost.com, April Mullen shares a few suggestions for managing “emotionally opted-out customers” – recipients in your email database who have not opened an email from you in a long period of time. These are folks who are “disinterested in your brand’s emails, but aren’t taking the time to unsubscribe.” She says industry experts are divided on whether it is best to purge or keep these types of recipients. But instead of coming down on one side or the other of that argument, she advises taking a case by approach to how to manage your emotionally opted-out customers, and offers helpful decision-making tips.

Email remains a good investment

“Email should never be too far from top-of-mind for any marketer and it is a key element in today’s mobile-first world,” writes David Kirkpatrick at marketingdive.com. He cites the results of several research studies pointing to the continuing importance of email for marketers, and calls out the strategic necessity of personalizing recipients’ experience with “dynamically changing messages, creative elements and making use of geo-targeting.” He also notes that email continues to be a vital way to reach Millennials and their younger Generation Z counterparts.